Discussion:
Trolling GitHub for ideas
(too old to reply)
Richard Hipp
2017-11-25 14:17:38 UTC
Permalink
The SQLite project is mirrored on GitHub (not by me). This mirror
provides a good opportunity to compare the interfaces of GitHub and
Fossil using the same underlying data.

https://sqlite.org/srcx/timeline?basic
https://github.com/mackyle/sqlite/commits/master

Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
--
D. Richard Hipp
***@sqlite.org
Offray Vladimir Luna Cárdenas
2017-11-25 17:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Hipp
The SQLite project is mirrored on GitHub (not by me). This mirror
provides a good opportunity to compare the interfaces of GitHub and
Fossil using the same underlying data.
https://sqlite.org/srcx/timeline?basic
https://github.com/mackyle/sqlite/commits/master
Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
The first think that jumps into attention are user avatars and checksums
in front of each commit. There ares some users with generic avatars and
others with custom ones. I think that some users would like to have some
small eye candy for their users inside fossil repositories, like
avatars. The checksums could be handy. Fossil seems more minimal (as we
know) and is really good to have the branches with code colors showed in
the time line.

Cheers,
Offray
Javier Guerra Giraldez
2017-11-27 09:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Hipp
Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
the only github think i've really missed when using fossil for
non-personal projects is the ability to comment on a diff.

I have two different usecases for that: the first and most obvious is
to open a commit, check the diff (from the previous version) and add
comments about the changes actually done. if it goes on the right
direction, missing stuff, etc. depending on context, what i tend to
do is either edit the commiit's comment, or file a ticket with a link
to the commit. the latter is the most "correct" way, but it's harder
to keep in context. and neither allows me to reference a specific
point in the code.

the second case is when a branch is nearing completion and becomes a
candidate for merging. then, i review the diff and should file a
ticket. but it's hard to reference the diff itself. (yes, copy/paste
the url works but it's tedious and error prone). again, no way to
link a comment with a specific line.

is there a way to see what a merge would do in diff style? that alone
replaces most of the functionality of Pull Requests.

ideally, on any diff view (a commit, a diff between two versions, a
merge preview), i'd like to add comments right there, interleaved with
the code. optionally added to a ticket too; so that opening the ticket
would show all related comments, each with a short view of the code
and a link to the full context.
--
Javier
Stephan Beal
2017-11-27 12:18:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Javier Guerra Giraldez
ideally, on any diff view (a commit, a diff between two versions, a
merge preview), i'd like to add comments right there, interleaved with
the code. optionally added to a ticket too; so that opening the ticket
would show all related comments, each with a short view of the code
and a link to the full context.
GoogleCode (or one of the similar platforms) had the ability to comment on
lines of files/diffs, and i have missed that feature at least twice in
fossil.

i.e. +1
--
----- stephan beal
http://wanderinghorse.net/home/stephan/
"Freedom is sloppy. But since tyranny's the only guaranteed byproduct of
those who insist on a perfect world, freedom will have to do." -- Bigby Wolf
Johan Kuuse
2017-11-27 14:26:52 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, Nov 27, 2017 at 10:50 AM, Javier Guerra Giraldez
Post by Javier Guerra Giraldez
ideally, on any diff view (a commit, a diff between two versions, a
merge preview), i'd like to add comments right there, interleaved with
the code. optionally added to a ticket too; so that opening the ticket
would show all related comments, each with a short view of the code
and a link to the full context.
GoogleCode (or one of the similar platforms) had the ability to comment on
lines of files/diffs, and i have missed that feature at least twice in
fossil.
i.e. +1
Maybe what lacks Fossil is not a feature, but an accompanying
software, such as what Gerrit is for Git?

https://www.gerritcodereview.com/

BR,
Johan
--
----- stephan beal
http://wanderinghorse.net/home/stephan/
"Freedom is sloppy. But since tyranny's the only guaranteed byproduct of
those who insist on a perfect world, freedom will have to do." -- Bigby Wolf
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Jungle Boogie
2017-11-28 03:27:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Hipp
The SQLite project is mirrored on GitHub (not by me). This mirror
provides a good opportunity to compare the interfaces of GitHub and
Fossil using the same underlying data.
https://sqlite.org/srcx/timeline?basic
https://github.com/mackyle/sqlite/commits/master
Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
Often times I like to grab just a single file from someone's repo, i.e.
a .tmux.conf without needing to clone and/or download all their repo.
And I don't need to download the copy to the computer I'm on, but a
remote computer.

I find the file, click raw and see the contents in the browser:
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/mackyle/sqlite/master/src/shell.c.in
Then I can use fetch/ftp/wget/curl to grab the single file.

In Fossil, there is a 'Download' link, and this will actually download
the file locally, but not display in the browser.
https://sqlite.org/src/artifact/c441d7ddfbb8120c

I think there's ways to do show the file with fossil, but it's a little more
complicated, and there doesn't seem to be a button available on the
fossil link above.

tl;dr: Make it easier to show raw file contents on a webpage. Ideally,
the filename will be the suffix of the URL.:
https://sqlite.org/src/artifact/c441d7ddfbb8120c/shell.c.in

Thanks for the consideration!

Best,
j.b.
Post by Richard Hipp
--
D. Richard Hipp
Artur Shepilko
2017-11-28 05:16:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Hipp
Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
I think the answers depend on specifics of project workflow.
GitHub is a social platform ("social coding"), so its central features
are about providing places and tools to interact.

That SQLite repo on GitHub still just has the original Fossil's repo
history, so not much of "social" content (other than usernames).

In my workflows, the SCM part of GitHub is the least used -- Git
command line and IDE plugins give more than enough ways to present
timeline, show diffs, annotate code etc. If anything to point out
about the SCM view:
* the ease of Branch/Tag switching via drop-down box, yet Fossil's UI
timeline view better visualizes concurrency of branch development.
* timeline marks "conversations " i.e. commits that have user comments
-- it's easy to follow a conversation; again it's "social" part

Looking at the social part of GitHub -- that's where most areas are
just different vs. Fossil.
In a way, GitHub is just a giant structured message board:
* allows conversations on commits, code lines, push, pull requests
* the whole code-review system via pull request/merge
* issue-tracker allows assignment to contributors
* issue numbers are sequential (no-go with Fossil as tickets are
also distributed)
* convenient dashboard shows number of outstanding issues (assuming
the intended state is 0, which often is not the case :))
* notifications, when relevant
* nice wiki editing toolbar (for Markdown) -- helps to "non-coders"
contributors used to toolbars
* CONSISTENCY -- this all appears to nicely "fit together" (by now);
edit text-boxes are uniform and support same input formats

Another useful feature is a link to travis-CI (continuous integration)
-- it's a service and does need a set up, but again it "fits".

This does not mean I'd like to see these features ported to Fossil.
That would change the Fossil-specific workflow which is lightweight
and distributed, as opposed to "centralized" GitHub. In fact most of
the "social" features assume a central repo.

I guess, as long as we could define and replicate CONSISTENCY, the
current Fossil UI features are sufficient already.

Maybe we could collect more real-life Fossil project use-cases (so far
the most prominent are SQLite and Fossil).
Basically, outlining the actual setup and project workflow used,
challenges too -- this could be an easier way to follow for someone
thinking to start a new project. Also it will help expose both the
useful and the missing features.
I'm currently facing a challenge to convince a non-coder contributor
to learn basic Markdown and not "freak-out" about all the other
buttons on the Fossil wiki page...Then will come a question about
inserting images in wiki...
Thomas Levine
2017-11-28 07:27:52 UTC
Permalink
The main GitHub feature that I would like is directions as to how to
download and check out the repository. I like to implement this in
fossil as a footer.
https://thomaslevine.com/scm/langrompiloj/

I believe that someone mentioned this feature in the Fossil-NG Bloat
thread, but I can't find the message at the moment.
Olivier R.
2017-11-28 13:15:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Hipp
Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
Applying a patch/diff from someone who has no right on the repo.

Olivier
Jungle Boogie
2017-11-30 02:21:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Hipp
The SQLite project is mirrored on GitHub (not by me). This mirror
provides a good opportunity to compare the interfaces of GitHub and
Fossil using the same underlying data.
https://sqlite.org/srcx/timeline?basic
https://github.com/mackyle/sqlite/commits/master
Your suggestions for useful features found in GitHub but missing from
Fossil, or for pages in GitHub that work especially well and that you
would like to see replicated in Fossil, are greatly appreciated.
It would be nice if, when line numbers are enabled, for there to be a
link on the line number and for that to highlight the line for an easy
way to share links.

https://github.com/mackyle/sqlite/blob/master/src/delete.c#L83

Notice all the line numbers left of the code are links, allowing an easy
way to highlight it.

It's possible to highlight lines (or multiple lines) in fossil, but you
need to manually edit the URL:
https://www.fossil-scm.org/index.html/artifact?ln=45-52&name=24bd6b806af1782c

It's nice that highlighting is possible, but it's not obvious how to do
it.
Javier Guerra Giraldez
2017-11-30 10:56:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jungle Boogie
It's possible to highlight lines (or multiple lines) in fossil, but you
https://www.fossil-scm.org/index.html/artifact?ln=45-52&name=24bd6b806af1782c
this is great, wish i knew that before!
--
Javier
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