Discussion:
Upgrade Fossil on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
(too old to reply)
Scott Meyer
2012-09-26 12:32:15 UTC
Permalink
Hello all,

New to Fossil and what I see so far is perfect for our needs. I
installed the Fossil package from Ubuntu 12.04 repositories using the
apt-get install command. I would like to upgrade to the last version
and from what I have found in the documentation it seems all I need to
do is download the Linux zip file and replace the existing fossil exe
with the new one.

The current fossil executable is located in /usr/bin. When I unzipped
the Linux zip file I put the new fossil file in the /usr/bin directory
and when I try to use fossil I get an internal server error. While in
the /usr/bin directory I tried "fossil all rebuild" and I get "No such
file or directory".

When I type fossil in the directory I unzipped the new file I get the
fossil command help, so I assume that it works.

How do I get to the new version of fossil?

The environment is Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

Thanks
Richard Hipp
2012-09-26 13:00:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Meyer
Hello all,
New to Fossil and what I see so far is perfect for our needs. I
installed the Fossil package from Ubuntu 12.04 repositories using the
apt-get install command. I would like to upgrade to the last version
and from what I have found in the documentation it seems all I need to
do is download the Linux zip file and replace the existing fossil exe
with the new one.
The current fossil executable is located in /usr/bin. When I unzipped
the Linux zip file I put the new fossil file in the /usr/bin directory
and when I try to use fossil I get an internal server error. While in
the /usr/bin directory I tried "fossil all rebuild" and I get "No such
file or directory".
When I type fossil in the directory I unzipped the new file I get the
fossil command help, so I assume that it works.
How do I get to the new version of fossil?
Unfortunately, Linux seems to be devolved such that various distributions
are no longer binary compatible. You have to have a executable compiled
for your particular build of your distribution. Or, at least, I haven't
figured out how to create an executable that works across multiple
distributions....

On the other hand, it is easy to compile from sources on Linux. Just grab
the source tarball and untar it. Then do:

./configure --with-openssl=none; make

The command above will generate the "fossil" executable in your working
directory. To install the new executable:

sudo mv fossil /usr/bin
Post by Scott Meyer
The environment is Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
Thanks
_______________________________________________
fossil-users mailing list
http://lists.fossil-scm.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/fossil-users
--
D. Richard Hipp
***@sqlite.org
Scott Meyer
2012-09-26 13:14:29 UTC
Permalink
Worked. Thanks.
Post by Richard Hipp
Post by Scott Meyer
Hello all,
New to Fossil and what I see so far is perfect for our needs. I
installed the Fossil package from Ubuntu 12.04 repositories using the
apt-get install command. I would like to upgrade to the last version
and from what I have found in the documentation it seems all I need to
do is download the Linux zip file and replace the existing fossil exe
with the new one.
The current fossil executable is located in /usr/bin. When I unzipped
the Linux zip file I put the new fossil file in the /usr/bin directory
and when I try to use fossil I get an internal server error. While in
the /usr/bin directory I tried "fossil all rebuild" and I get "No such
file or directory".
When I type fossil in the directory I unzipped the new file I get the
fossil command help, so I assume that it works.
How do I get to the new version of fossil?
Unfortunately, Linux seems to be devolved such that various distributions
are no longer binary compatible. You have to have a executable compiled for
your particular build of your distribution. Or, at least, I haven't figured
out how to create an executable that works across multiple distributions....
On the other hand, it is easy to compile from sources on Linux. Just grab
./configure --with-openssl=none; make
The command above will generate the "fossil" executable in your working
sudo mv fossil /usr/bin
Post by Scott Meyer
The environment is Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
Thanks
_______________________________________________
fossil-users mailing list
http://lists.fossil-scm.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/fossil-users
--
D. Richard Hipp
_______________________________________________
fossil-users mailing list
http://lists.fossil-scm.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/fossil-users
Alek Paunov
2012-09-28 18:59:50 UTC
Permalink
[Forwarding the thread to the Debian/Ubuntu Fossil maintainer]

Hi Barak,

Please send a proper URL for bug reports against the Debian/Ubuntu packages.

As you can see from this beautiful thread, our list seriously lacks the
maintainers voice ;-)

Kind Regards,
Alek
Post by Scott Meyer
Worked. Thanks.
Post by Richard Hipp
Post by Scott Meyer
Hello all,
New to Fossil and what I see so far is perfect for our needs. I
installed the Fossil package from Ubuntu 12.04 repositories using the
apt-get install command. I would like to upgrade to the last version
and from what I have found in the documentation it seems all I need to
do is download the Linux zip file and replace the existing fossil exe
with the new one.
The current fossil executable is located in /usr/bin. When I unzipped
the Linux zip file I put the new fossil file in the /usr/bin directory
and when I try to use fossil I get an internal server error. While in
the /usr/bin directory I tried "fossil all rebuild" and I get "No such
file or directory".
When I type fossil in the directory I unzipped the new file I get the
fossil command help, so I assume that it works.
How do I get to the new version of fossil?
Unfortunately, Linux seems to be devolved such that various distributions
are no longer binary compatible. You have to have a executable compiled for
your particular build of your distribution. Or, at least, I haven't figured
out how to create an executable that works across multiple distributions....
On the other hand, it is easy to compile from sources on Linux. Just grab
./configure --with-openssl=none; make
The command above will generate the "fossil" executable in your working
sudo mv fossil /usr/bin
Post by Scott Meyer
The environment is Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
Thanks
Alek Paunov
2012-09-29 14:32:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alek Paunov
Please send a proper URL for bug reports against the Debian/Ubuntu packages.
Sure. You can look at
http://bugs.debian.org/fossil
http://packages.qa.debian.org/f/fossil.html
Although bugs can be submitted by manually composing email, the
reportbug(1) program is probably best, as it composes appropriate
email including exhaustive version information.
Thank you! At the attention of the Debian/Ubuntu users - please
bookmarks these URLs and remember to use the your reportbug tool. These
should serve as first level of support for you.

Throwing OS specific (package version in the OP case) issues directly to
the project developers often leads to suboptimal workarounds, which
being recorded "as-is" by the archives, result in unnecessary (sometimes
quiet) frustration for the future users.
I'm the Debian maintainer, not responsible for Ubuntu, but I believe
Ubuntu is taking the Debian package without modification.
So, from the Debian package page it is obvious that you are doing your
job as maintainer just perfectly - 1.23 has been packaged only a couple
of days after the upstream release (month before this thread). The same
for 1.22 and before + zero pending bugs in the tracker.

Barak, is it possible and safe for an Ubuntu user to pull with apt-get
the newest Debian package version for testing? Something equivalent of:

yum --enablerepo=rawhide update fossil

in Fedora.

Thank you,
Alek

John Found
2012-09-27 04:25:25 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 09:00:40 -0400
Post by Richard Hipp
Unfortunately, Linux seems to be devolved such that various distributions
are no longer binary compatible. You have to have a executable compiled
for your particular build of your distribution. Or, at least, I haven't
figured out how to create an executable that works across multiple
distributions....
Offtopic: This is very strange statement.
I am trying to write programs in assembly language for Windwos and Linux and
always though Linux distributions are binary compatible (for the same CPU of course).
Where I can read more on this topic? What actually differs? Libraries, system calls
of something else?

Best regards
--
John Found
http://asm32.hopto.org
Christopher Vance
2012-09-27 05:30:38 UTC
Permalink
The binary runs fine if the shared libraries used on your distribution
have the same version numbers as those the binary is compiled against,
and assuming the same library source version gets to be the same
library runtime version. Just like DLL hell.

I don't know if insisting on LSB would coerce use of a smaller choice
of possible version numbers.

Best is to use a prepackaged version from your Linux vendor or to
compile yourself from source.
Post by John Found
On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 09:00:40 -0400
Post by Richard Hipp
Unfortunately, Linux seems to be devolved such that various distributions
are no longer binary compatible. You have to have a executable compiled
for your particular build of your distribution. Or, at least, I haven't
figured out how to create an executable that works across multiple
distributions....
Offtopic: This is very strange statement.
I am trying to write programs in assembly language for Windwos and Linux and
always though Linux distributions are binary compatible (for the same CPU of course).
Where I can read more on this topic? What actually differs? Libraries, system calls
of something else?
--
Christopher Vance
Mike Meyer
2012-09-27 06:33:23 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 15:30:38 +1000
Post by Christopher Vance
The binary runs fine if the shared libraries used on your distribution
have the same version numbers as those the binary is compiled against,
and assuming the same library source version gets to be the same
library runtime version. Just like DLL hell.
And gnu CC/glibc between them make building a truly static binary
nearly impossible, if not completely so. I'd assume you can avoid
those issues if you're writing assembler.
Post by Christopher Vance
Best is to use a prepackaged version from your Linux vendor or to
compile yourself from source.
Unfortunately true if you're using a Unix that uses glibc. Which
leaves only the Mac with enough users to make a binary distribution
worthwhile.

<mike
--
Mike Meyer <***@mired.org> http://www.mired.org/
Independent Software developer/SCM consultant, email for more information.

O< ascii ribbon campaign - stop html mail - www.asciiribbon.org
Jan Nijtmans
2012-09-27 07:02:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Found
Post by Richard Hipp
Unfortunately, Linux seems to be devolved such that various distributions
are no longer binary compatible. You have to have a executable compiled
for your particular build of your distribution. Or, at least, I haven't
figured out how to create an executable that works across multiple
distributions....
Offtopic: This is very strange statement.
I am trying to write programs in assembly language for Windwos and Linux and
always though Linux distributions are binary compatible (for the same CPU of course).
Where I can read more on this topic? What actually differs? Libraries, system calls
of something else?
Well, I have a theory on this subject, and it's not as complicated as other
posts in this thread suggest.

There is a binary difference involved here: between the x86 and amd64 (also
known as x64) processor. 32-bit linux it totally different from 64-bit
linux, but
in order to make 32-bit binaries run on 64-bit linux, all kinds of 'wrapper'
shared libraries are created that pass things through as needed. My
guess is that the problem discussed here is a bug in one of those
wrapper shared libraries. It must be related to the inet libraries,
which handle the connection to the net, because the symptom
of the problem is "host not found". I saw it on my own 64-bit Ubuntu 12.04.

Solutions? I see two of them.
- Add support for ipv6 to fossil. This will call totally different functions for
hostname resolution, so I wouldn't be surprised if this problem magically
disappears as soon as ipv6 support is in fossil. 32-bit skype runs
fine on 64-bit linux, and that application makes ip connections too.
- If that doesn't work, provide two different fossil binaries, one for 32-bit
and one for 64-bit linux. That should be enough to cover all cases.

Regards,
Jan Nijtmans
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