Discussion:
Can't believe --branchcolor would be platform-specific
(too old to reply)
Francois Vogel
2018-07-07 11:29:53 UTC
Permalink
Hi all,

I'm experiencing the following error on macOS and Linux:

$ f commit -m "Fix bug" --branch mybranch --branchcolor #f0a0a0
unrecognized command-line option, or missing argument: --branchcolor
$ fossil version
This is fossil version 2.6 [9718f3b078] 2018-05-04 12:56:42 UTC
$ f commit -m "Fix bug" --branch mybranch
New_Version: xxxx  <hash removed here>

The same command with --branchcolor, succeeds on Windows (but here I'm
using fossil-2.1).

Any thoughts on this perhaps? Couldn't find the light reading the
documentation, I can't see why the --branchcolor option would be
platform-specific. Or is it that this option got removed since 2.1
?'fossil help commit' still documents it however.

Thanks!
Francois
Martin Gagnon
2018-07-07 12:11:57 UTC
Permalink
My guess is that on a bash shell, # is the symbol for comments. Try to put
it in double quotes;
e.g.: —branchcolor "#f0a0a0"

Regards,
(Sorry for top posting and brevity, I’m on mobile)

—
Martin G.
Post by Francois Vogel
Hi all,
$ f commit -m "Fix bug" --branch mybranch --branchcolor #f0a0a0
unrecognized command-line option, or missing argument: --branchcolor
$ fossil version
This is fossil version 2.6 [9718f3b078] 2018-05-04 12:56:42 UTC
$ f commit -m "Fix bug" --branch mybranch
New_Version: xxxx <hash removed here>
The same command with --branchcolor, succeeds on Windows (but here I'm
using fossil-2.1).
Any thoughts on this perhaps? Couldn't find the light reading the
documentation, I can't see why the --branchcolor option would be
platform-specific. Or is it that this option got removed since 2.1
?'fossil help commit' still documents it however.
Thanks!
Francois
_______________________________________________
fossil-users mailing list
http://lists.fossil-scm.org:8080/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/fossil-users
Stephan Beal
2018-07-07 12:26:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Martin Gagnon
My guess is that on a bash shell, # is the symbol for comments. Try to put
it in double quotes;
e.g.: —branchcolor "#f0a0a0"
That is definitely what's happening, and it's not bash-specific: every[^1]
Unix-style shell known to man treats an unescaped # as the start of a
comment. An alternate approach, aside from quotes is:

--branchcolor \#f0a0a0


[1] = obviously, since i say "every" in public, someone will now point out
an exception to that rule. That said, i'm not aware of any exceptions.
--
----- stephan beal
http://wanderinghorse.net/home/stephan/
"Freedom is sloppy. But since tyranny's the only guaranteed byproduct of
those who insist on a perfect world, freedom will have to do." -- Bigby Wolf
Francois Vogel
2018-07-07 12:39:52 UTC
Permalink
Many thanks for your answers. I'm always impressed how members of this
list are helpful and reply quickly.

Regards,
Francois
Martin Gagnon
2018-07-07 12:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Francois Vogel
Many thanks for your answers. I'm always impressed how members of this
list are helpful and reply quickly.
Bienvenue
--
Martin G.
Loading...